Examining All 32 NHL Goaltending Tandems For 2022-23 Season: Part I

Photo by Michael Martin/NHLI via Getty Images

With a number of teams changing up their goaltending across the NHL this offseason, NoVa Caps takes a look at all of the 32 team’s goaltending situation for the 2022-23 season. We do so in the order of combined salary cap hit and how that ranks among the league. Today, we look at No’s. 32-21 in this three-part series.

32. Dallas Stars – $1M (Scott Wedgewood/Jake Oettinger – RFA)

Oettinger, 23, went 30-15-1 with a .914 save percentage, 2.53 goals-against average, and one shutout last season. At five-on-five, he posted a .920 save percentage (including .856 at high-danger), 2.31 goals-against average (1.09), 3.96 goals-saved above average (8.43). Oettinger, who is currently a restricted free agent (which will likely bump the Stars’ tandem into the more expensive ones) also turned in an .865 save percentage and a 0.00 goals-saved above average while shorthanded.

Wedgewood, 29, posted a 13-15-6 record, .910 save percentage, 3.14 goals-against average, and a shutout in 37 games last season, including 3-1-3 with a .913 save percentage and a 3.05 goals-against average in eight games after the Stars acquired him from the Arizona Coyotes on March 20. He earned a .917 save percentage (.820 at high-danger), 2.79 goals-against average (1.66), 0.97 goals-saved above average (-1.49) at five-on-five last season. On the penalty kill, Wedgewood tallied an .878 save percentage in addition to a 2.16 goals-saved average.

31. Buffalo Sabres – $3.3M (Eric Comrie/Craig Anderson)

Comrie, 27, recorded a 10-5-1 record with a .920 save percentage, 2.58 goals-against average, and one shutout with the Winnipeg Jets in 2021-22. At five-on-five, he posted a .936 save percentage (.862 at high-danger), 1.97 goals-against average (1.19), 8.78 goals-saved above average (4.43). Comrie posted in an .833 save percentage and a -2.65 goals-saved above average while shorthanded.

Anderson, 41, concluded last season 17-12-2 with an .897 save percentage (.898 at five-on-five, including .806 at high-danger), 3.12 goals-against average (3.02 at five-on-five), and a -13.71 five-on-five goals-saved above average (-4.20 at high-danger). With his team playing a man short in front of him, Anderson earned an .892 save percentage and a 3.22 goals-saved above average.

30. Arizona Coyotes – $3.475M (Karel Vejmelka/Jon Gillies)

Vejmelka, 29, posted a 13-32-3 record, .898 save percentage, 3.68 goals-against average, and a shutout in 52 games during 2021-22. He finished with a .906 save percentage (.834 at high-danger), 3.30 goals-against average (1.65), and a -12.9 goals-saved above average (3.15) at five-on-five last season. Vejmelka also earned an .849 save percentage and a -4.13 goals-saved average when the Coyotes played down a man in front of him.

Gillies, 28, went 3-10-2 with an .887 save percentage and a 3.70 goals-against average in 19 NHL games with the New Jersey Devils and St. Louis Blues last year. He recorded an .898 save percentage (.798 at high-danger), 3.39 goals-against average (1.66), and a -8.37 goals-saved above average (-3.14) at five-on-five. Gillies, who turned in an .895 save percentage in one AHL game, posted an .885 save percentage and a 1.03 goals-saved average on his teams’ penalty kill.

29. Minnesota Wild – $4.2875M (Marc-Andre Fleury/Filip Gustavsson)

Fleury, 37, posted a 28-23-5 record, .908 save percentage, 2.90 goals-against average, and four shutouts in 56 games last season, including 9-2-0 with a .910 save percentage and a 2.74 goals-against average in 11 games after the Wild acquired him from the Chicago Blackhawks on March 20. He tallied a .919 save percentage (.816 at high-danger), 2.51 goals-against average (1.35), 4.80 goals-saved above average (-3.08) at five-on-five combined with both teams. Playing behind a penalty killing unit, Fleury notched an .854 save percentage as well as a -2.7 goals-saved average.

Gustavsson, 24, finished last year with a 5-12-1 record, .892 save percentage (.907 at five-on-five, including .785 at high-danger), 3.55 goals-against average (2.96 at five-on-five, including 1.83 at high-danger), a -4.04 five-on-five goals-saved above average (-4.92 at high-danger) with the Ottawa Senators. With a penalty kill in front of him, Gustavsson earned an .841 save percentage and a 3.22 goals-saved above average. He also tallied a .915 save percentage and a 2.50 goals-against average in 20 AHL games.

28. Chicago Blackhawks – $4.55M (Petr Mrazek/Alex Stalock)

Mrazek, 30, recorded a 12-6-0 record with an .888 save percentage and a 3.34 goals-against average with the Toronto Maple Leafs a season ago. At five-on-five, he notched an .890 save percentage (.766 at high-danger), 3.16 goals-against average (1.76), and a -10.49 goals-saved above average (-6.36). Mrazek also earned an .862 save percentage and a -0.22 goals-saved above average on the P.K. He earned an .846 save percentage in one AHL game.

Stalock, 34, gave up six goals on 22 shots (.786 save percentage, -4.23 five-on-five goals-saved above average) in his lone NHL start last season with the San Jose Sharks. He also went 4-10-2 with an .867 save percentage and 3.93 goals-against average in 17 AHL games between the San Jose Barracuda and Bakersfield Condors.

27. Philadelphia Flyers – $4.729M (Carter Hart/Troy Grosenick)

Hart, 23, went 13-24-7 with a .905 save percentage, 3.16 goals-against average, and a shutout in 46 games last season. He tallied a .917 save percentage (.820 at high-danger), 2.71 goals-against average (1.48), and a 1.87 goals-saved above average (1.65) at five-on-five. While the Flyers were down a man, Hart earned an .843 save percentage in addition to a -4.24 goals-saved average.

Grosenick, 32, went 16-6-6 with a .933 save percentage, 2.00 goals-against average, and three shutouts for the AHL’s Providence Bruins.

26. Pittsburgh Penguins – $5.3M (Tristan Jarry/Casey DeSmith)

Jarry, 27, went 34-18-6 with a .919 save percentage, 2.42 goals-against average, and four shutouts in 58 games last season. He wrapped the year up with a .925 save percentage (.824 at high-danger), 2.22 goals-against average (1.40), and an 11.97 goals-saved above average (-0.55) at five-on-five. He also recorded an .905 save percentage and a 7.54 goals-saved average behind the Penguins’ penalty kill.

DeSmith, 30, went 11-6-5 with a .914 save percentage, 2.79 goals-against average, and three shutouts in 26 games last season. He earned a .922 save percentage (.806 at high-danger), 2.51 goals-against average (1.57), and a 3.76 goals-saved above average (-3.00) at five-on-five. DeSmith tallied an .860 save percentage and a -0.49 goals-saved average while his team was short a man in front of him.

25. Colorado Avalanche – $5.4M (Alexandar Georgiev/Pavel Francouz)

Georgiev, 26, went 15-10-2 with an .898 save percentage (.914 at five-on-five, including .811 at high-danger, and .794 on the penalty-kill), 2.92 goals-against average (2.40 at five-on-five, including 1.47 at high-danger), and a -1.26 goals-saved above average at five-on-five (-7.22 when playing behind a P.K. unit) in 33 regular-season games with the New York Rangers last season.

Francouz, 32, tallied a 15-5-1 record, .916 save percentage (.929 at five-on-five, including .852 at high-danger, and .863 on the penalty-kill), 2.55 goals-against average (2.13 at five-on-five, including 1.26 at high-danger), and a 3.52 five-on-five goals-saved above average (-0.13 on the penalty kill) in 21 games.

24. Edmonton Oilers – $5.75M (Jack Campbell/Stuart Skinner)

Campbell, 30, went 31-9-6 with a .914 save percentage (.917 at five-on-five, including .786 at high-danger, and .890 on the penalty-kill), 2.64 goals-against average (2.51 at five-on-five, including 1.62 at high-danger), five shutouts, and a 1.71 five-on-five goals-saved above average (4.03 with a man short) with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 2021-22.

Skinner, 23, played just 13 NHL games last season, going 6-6-0 with a .913 save percentage (.916 at 5-on-5, including .824 at high-danger, and .885 on the penalty-kill), 2.62 goals-against average (2.54 at five-on-five, including 1.62 at high-danger), a shutout, in addition to a 0.08 goals-saved above average (1.03 while playing behind a penalty kill).

23. Vancouver Canucks – $5.7625M (Thatcher Demko/Spencer Martin)

Demko, 26, went 33-22-7 with a .915 save percentage, 2.72 goals-against average, and a shutout in 64 games last season. He earned a .932 save percentage (.852 at high-danger), 2.12 goals-against average (1.24), and a 24.71 goals-saved above average (11.16) at five-on-five. When the Canucks played shorthanded, Demko turned in an .840 save percentage and a -6.83 goals-saved average.

Martin, 30, recorded a 3-0-3 record with a .950 save percentage and 1.74 goals-against average in six NHL games last year. At five-on-five, he notched a .948 save percentage (1.000 at high-danger), 1.61 goals-against average (0.40), and a 4.88 goals-saved above average (4.97). Martin also tallied an .862 save percentage and a -0.22 goals-saved above average on the P.K. He earned an .846 save percentage in one AHL game.

22. Boston Bruins – $5.925M (Linus Ullmark/Jeremy Swayman)

Swayman, 23, went 23-14-3 with a .914 save percentage (.922 at five-on-five, including .815 at high-danger, and .857 on the penalty-kill), 2.41 goals-against average (2.40 at five-on-five, including 1.47 at high-danger), three shutouts, and a 5.44 goals-saved above average at five-on-five (-2.03 at high-danger and -1.30 when playing behind a penalty kill) in 41 games last year.

Ullmark, 28, recorded a 26-10-2 record with an .916 save percentage (.920 at-five-on-five, including .815 at high-danger, and .887 with a man short), a 2.45 goals-against average (2.23 at five-on-five), and a 3.54 five-on-five goals-saved above average (1.18 at high-danger, 4.22 on the penalty kill).

21. Washington Capitals – $6.35M (Darcy Kuemper/Charlie Lindgren)

Kuemper, 32, went 37-12-4 with a .921 save percentage, 2.54 goals-against average, and five shutouts with the Avalanche in the regular season. At five-on-five, Kuemper earned a .928 save percentage, a 2.26 goals-against average, a 4.33 goals-saved above average, and a .863 high-danger save percentage. He also finished with an .879 save percentage and a 2.32 goals-saved above average on the penalty kill.

Lindgren, 28, went 5-0-0 with a .958 save percentage and 1.22 goals-against average in five NHL games with the St. Louis Blues last season. He also posted a .925 save percentage and a 2.21 goals-against average in 34 games with the AHL’s Springfield Thunderbirds. At five-on-five during his time in the NHL, Lindgren posted a .950 save percentage (including .913 at high-danger), 1.45 goals-against average, and a 3.42 goals-saved above average at the NHL-level. He also tallied a 1.000 save percentage and a 1.62 goals-saved above average while his team killed penalties.

By Harrison Brown

About Harrison Brown

Harrison is a diehard Caps fan and a hockey fanatic with a passion for sports writing. He attended his first game at age 8 and has been a season ticket holder since the 2010-2011 season. His fondest Caps memory was watching the Capitals hoist the Stanley Cup in Las Vegas. In his spare time, he enjoys travel, photography, and hanging out with his two dogs. Follow Harrison on Twitter @HarrisonB927077
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5 Responses to Examining All 32 NHL Goaltending Tandems For 2022-23 Season: Part I

  1. Anonymous says:

    at this time, there are too many unknowns… How will CM and AP play/develop?
    How will TW play upon return?
    Same for Nick…

    I still think we need one more D…

    • Anon replier says:

      1. This is about goalies not forwards, so it doesn’t matter as much a young forward develops this year or even the recovery of a veteran. While nothing exists in a vacuum, the exercise was focused on goalie tandems related to their cost to bringing Up out forwards is tangential
      2. Every single team has unknowns, all the time, so simplying pointing out an incomplete list of the capitals without noting the similar situations of all other teams seems to imply the caps are unique in dealing with youth development of injuries. Many teams, including several in the division, would beg to differ as they gave the exact same kinds of questions to answer that we do

  2. Jeff says:

    Wait…. you think the Stars have the worst goalie situation in the league?

  3. DWGie26 says:

    I like our goalie situation a lot better this year. Proven tendy in Keumper and I like the potential of Charlie Sideburns. On paper anyway, this should not be a weak spot like it has been. Also, excited that we were able to significantly improve while still remaining in the bottom 25% in cap. Well done.

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