Closed Arenas Cause Delay In NHL’s ‘Puck And Player’ Tracking Rollout

The NHL’s much-anticipated rollout of its Puck & Player Tracking System, announced  during All-Star Weekend in January 2019, will not rollout with the resumption of play this summer. At least not at the start.

According to the Boston Globe, per the league office in New York, shuttered rinks across the Original 31 since early March meant the critical installation work of the system’s data infrastructure was interrupted. It had been completed in 26 arenas.

Another issue: the on-site staffing required to run all the bells and whistles. The league and union have been adamant about limiting the number of bodies inside each of the two hub arenas, which will play host initially to 12 teams at each site. Fewer gadgets, fewer personnel, fewer potential contact issues.

It’s possible, according to a league spokesperson, that the system will be integrated and operational as the postseason evolves. No doubt everyone involved, especially fans eager to see how the system might interface with legalized betting, would like to see it used for the Stanley Cup Final, currently and tentatively scheduled to begin approximately Oct. 1 (all dates flexible).

By Jon Sorensen

Further Reading
Hockey’s Next-Generation Technologies – Puck and Player Tracking Systems Come to the Capitals
Tracking Chips to be Used in World Cup of Hockey
Will The NHL’s Next-Generation Data and Data Management Models Splinter and Divide Hockey Analytics?
KHL Rolls Out New Advanced Data And Analytics System Ahead Of NHL
Monumental Sports And Entertainment And William Hill Announce Sports Betting Partnership
Commissioner Bettman Provides Update On Puck-Tracking Technology Rollout

About Jon Sorensen

Jon has been a Caps fan since day one, attending his first game at the Capital Centre in 1974. His passion for the Caps has grown over the decades, which has included time as a season ticket holder, social media and community organizer, and most recently led to the founding of NoVa Caps in 2014. Jon earned a Bachelor's of Science in Engineering at Old Dominion University, and is a Systems Engineer during intermissions, which has been instrumental in supporting his Capitals habit.
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