Washington Capitals Players Speak Out Against Racism, Participate in “Blackout Tuesday”

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The death of George Floyd has sparked many athletes to voice their opinions, demand change, and to speak out against racism. Washington Capitals players took to social media expressing their thoughts as well as participating in “Blackout Tuesday”, which is a music industry protest that made its way into popular culture.

Alex Ovechkin

Tom Wilson

Wilson made a donation to the East Of The River Mutual Aid Fund and to the Fort Dupont Cannons Hockey Program:

Black Lives Matter. There is no place for racism and hate in our world. After taking some time to think about the best way to offer my support, I’ve decided that one way to start is to take action in my own community. I will be making a donation to the “East Of The River Mutual Aid Fund” as well as to the Fort Dupont Cannons Hockey Program. The Cannons, based in DC, are the oldest minority hockey program in the country. I am contributing to these funds today, but I am committing to learn, to listen, and to support going forward.

T.J. Oshie

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#blackouttuesday

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Lars Eller

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#blackouttuesday

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Shane Gersich

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Liam O’Brien

Axel Jonsson-Fjällby

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John Carlson

Brenden Dillon

Jonas Siegenthaler

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#BlackOutTuesday

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The Holtbys

I stare at the Woodrow Wilson Bridge, spanning across the Potomac River. From Virginia it leads into Maryland, into Prince George’s County. One of the most affluent Black counties in America. And here a monstrous bridge stands, named after a racist president. A president who was an outspoken white supremacist. Who segregated federal workers based on race. The bridge sits there mocking every black person who has to travel across it while reading that name as a reminder of how much pain has been inflicted on their race. And yet, the society that has inflicted that pain seems proud of it. Proud enough to name a bridge in a white supremacists honor.

The injustice and hatred infused power we’ve seen recently is anything but new. To say there have been improvements is very naive. In today’s age of information and communication at our fingertips the change is far too minimal. The amount of inhumane, hate based, racial crimes that have been committed in the centuries of American history is enough to make your skin crawl in discomfort and your eyes well with tears. Yet it’s still happening. In 2020. It should never happen. Yet it still is.

So now what? Where do we go from here? As a person who definitely falls into the white privileged category, I know I will never truly know what it’s like to walk in a black man’s shoes. But I know that I have arms, and ears, and a voice to walk beside and listen to every word of anguish and give my strength to every black man, woman, or child until their shoes weigh the same as mine.

For everyone standing up and marching for what is right, your voices are not going unheard. You’re bringing pride to every person who believes in the universal value of a human being. Keep fighting, and I vow to demonstrate and educate what you are fighting for. Not only to myself but my children, family and anyone else who will listen. Because America will never be great until all BLACK lives matter.

The Capitals

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#BlackOutTuesday

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Former Capitals Players

Devante Smith-Pelly

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BLACK LIVES MATTER

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Brett Connolly

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Mike Green

Brooks Laich

Nathan Walker

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Madison Bowey

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#blackouttuesday 🖤

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By Della Young

About Della Young

Della Young is a fiction writer based out of the Northern Virginia/Washington, D.C. area and an online student attending Full Sail University. She got her start in the entertainment industry at age seven as an actress. At the young age of nine, Della wrote a psychological thriller short story that sparked her interest in creative writing. She comes from a family of big Capitals fans and became inspired to start writing for sports. In her spare time, Della enjoys photography, traveling, and working on both sides of the camera. Follow Della on Twitter: @dellayoung
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