More NHL Players Turning To Synthetic Ice During Pause For COVID-19 Pandemic

Photo: CAN-ICE

As ice rinks continue to remain closed due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, more and more NHL’ers are turning to synthetic ice to get their practice fix.

“The first two weeks the NHL had off, probably a lot of players were just sitting around playing video games,” said Stephen J.,Wong. “Now, about two dozen (players) have been contacting us or their agents have. And with every new announcement about extending the delay in the season, they want to be back on their skates even more.

Company founder/former NHLer of CAN-ICE, Danny Gare, and entrepreneur Steven J. Wong already had clients such as Sidney Crosby (above), Jonathan Toews (below) and Joe Pavelski, as well as Vincent Lecavalier and Nik Antropov who sought the product for their hockey-playing sons.

“The product is easy to install, it’s double-sided, it’s only (.95 centimetres thick) and lays down like a kids puzzle. You can clip 18-inch boards on it or full rink boards.”

According to CAN-ICE, NHL players after using the CAN-ICE surface report that skating response is 85% that of fresh ice and 95-100% on puck response.

The raw panels, as large as 1.2 x 3.0 metres, go in an oven while under 27,579 kPa of pressure with the resin mixed in. It gives panels a density that can withstand temperatures between 82C and minus 184C for any environment and vitally, does not leave any shavings from the blade.

The cost starts at $400 Cdn. for the smallest panel and delivery in ideal circumstances is seven to 10 days. The Stojkos went into Wong’s basement, skating around plumbing pipes and all, for a video testimonial.

By Jon Sorensen

About Jon Sorensen

Jon has been a Caps fan since day one, attending his first game at the Capital Centre in 1974. His passion for the Caps has grown over the decades, which has included time as a season ticket holder, social media and community organizer, and most recently led to the founding of NoVa Caps in 2014. Jon earned a Bachelor's of Science in Engineering at Old Dominion University, and is a Systems Engineer during intermissions, which has been instrumental in supporting his Capitals habit.
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