The NHL’s Decision on Anton Stralman’s Hit to Tom Wilson A Missed Opportunity to Send the Correct Message

AP BLUE JACKETS CAPITALS HOCKEY S HKN USA DCUSA Today

After preaching a need for consistency on disciplinary action on illegal hits and plays in the league, the NHL’s Department of Player Safety had a prime opportunity to act upon that need after Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Anton Stralman boarded Capitals right wing Tom Wilson during Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Final, a play that resulted in a penalty for Stralman and voicing of frustration from Wilson. Sadly, the league decided that the play (one that usually draws the ire of the league because of its dangerous nature and results) was not deserving of a suspension, and in doing so, missed a prime opportunity to send a message to its teams.

Per The Washington Post’s Isabelle Khurshudyan, the NHL decided Wednesday that the hit by Stralman (which resulted in Wilson laying on the ice for several seconds, clearly shaken up and a knot on his head) was not worthy of any supplemental discipline, something that not only exemplifies the league’s seeming inability to deliver the consistency in disciplinary action they constantly preach, but its seeming willingness to turn a blind eye when a player who has received supplemental discipline before. Wilson himself seemed to express his frustration on the latter after Tuesday’s game:

“That’s a lot of ‘don’ts’ for me. From what they’ve been telling me, that’s a lot of ‘don’ts.’ If I make that hit, 100 percent I’m probably sitting out. So we’ll see. It’s playoffs. It’s an intense time of year”

Wilson also mentioned the criteria the league looks at when deciding if a hit warrants discipline:

“Everything I’ve heard all year: He sees (jersey) numbers for a good amount of time, and he elevates through the back of my shoulder and head.”

The league had a prime opportunity to institute the consistency they so desperately want to on an obviously dangerous hit in an important game at the most competitive time of the NHL season. Their ultimate failure to act upon that is not only an embarrassing one, but it is a missed opportunity to send a message to the league that they are serious about ending hits that could potentially result in serious injury to the player on the end of said hit. And until they begin to consistently do so, their decisions (or lack thereof) will continue to be taken as nothing more than a slap on the wrists.

By Michael Fleetwood

@tom_wilso suspended three games. 🐂💩 #Capitals #Pens #FreeWilly #PeNHL

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About Michael Fleetwood

Michael Fleetwood was born into a family of diehard Capitals fans and has been watching games as long as he can remember. He was born the year the Capitals went to their first and only Stanley Cup Final, and is a diehard Caps fan the owner of the very FIRST Joe Beninati jersey and since then, has met Joe himself. His favorite player became former Capital Nate Schmidt after he met Schmidt in a Hershey hotel while in Hershey PA to see the Bears play, shortly after Schmidt was injured during a conditioning stint. Michael is also a fan of the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Orioles, and enjoys photography and reading in his spare time. (Photo by Adam Vingan in 2014 at the Capitals Development Camp).
This entry was posted in News, NHL, Opinion, Playoffs, Teams, Washington Capitals and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The NHL’s Decision on Anton Stralman’s Hit to Tom Wilson A Missed Opportunity to Send the Correct Message

  1. Jon Sorensen says:

    Consistently inconsistent.

    Like

  2. Jon Sorensen says:

    DoP(e)S is 🐂💩

    Like

  3. Ron Bove says:

    You can bet your life, that if the players were reversed, there is no doubt they would have come down hard on Wilson. You are right, if they would be a little more consistent maybe they would send a better msg. to the players in the league.

    Like

  4. Anonymous says:

    National Hypocrite League.

    Like

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