When Did Braden Holtby’s Struggles Begin?

postseasonPhoto: Today’s Sports News

Braden Holtby recently went through the worst stretch of his career, losing six straight decisions (0-4-2) while having a 0.851 save percentage in the process. He also a dreadful outing against the Anaheim Ducks last night where he got pulled 5:37 into the second frame after giving up three goals on nine shots in the Capitals‘ 4-0 loss at Honda Center. Those stats are certainly non-Holtby like, which makes us ask when his struggles began? NoVa Caps takes a look at where Holtby’s struggles first began. 

2016-17

Month Wins Loses OTL Save Percentage GAA Shutouts
October 3 2 1 0.917 2.15 0
November 7 3 1 0.922 2.2 1
December 5 3 3 0.938 1.79 2
January 9 0 0 0.935 1.82 3
February 7 0 1 0.922 1.98 1
March 8 3 1 0.912 2.42 1
April (Regular Season) 2 1 0 0.961 1.13 1

Holtby was strong for most of the campaign in 2016-17 but his numbers seem to start to see a decline in December 2016. His goals-against average in March was his highest during a month of the 2016-17 season and he gave up four goals in three consecutive contests (March 6-12), which was probably a big part of that. Holtby was pretty solid the rest of the regular season going above a save percentage mark of .915 in all of the rest.

2017 Playoffs
vs. TOR 4 2 0.925 2.36
vs. PIT 3 4 0.887 2.57

Holtby had a slow start to the Toronto series, giving up four goals in each of Games 2-4 (.907 save percentage) in the series but rebounded nicely by stopping 61 out of 63 shots (.968 save percentage) in Games 5 and 6, which boosted his save percentage significantly.

The Pittsburgh series was a mess for Holtby. The Penguins tortured Sergei Bobrovsky, Holtby, Craig Anderson, and Pekka Rinne with their quality shooting percentage throughout the playoffs when they were outshot for the most part. This is when Holtby’s numbers started to drag down. He gave up 10 goals on 83 shots in the first four games of the series (0.879 save percentage) before stopping 62 of 68 shots (0.912 save percentage) in games 5-7 of the series.

2017-18

Month Wins Loses OTL Save Percentage GAA
October 5 3 0 0.919 2.75
November 8 2 0 0.922 2.46
December 9 (league lead) 2 0 0.915 2.67
January 3 1 2 0.912 2.8
Febraruy 2 5 2 0.873 4.52
March 1 1 0 0.868 3.51

Holtby got off to a strong start in 2017-18 with a 0.921 save percentage through November. Since then, he has a 0.892 save percentage and a 3.38 goals against average. Some of that has to do with a shaky defense in front of him but he still needs to be better despite a hole on the blueline. February was especially torturous for him as you can see above. He went through a career-long six-game dry spell and had a .851 save percentage in February. Holtby got pulled three times in the month and only won two games during the course of the month (both against the Columbus Blue Jackets).

Holtby may be going through a rough stretch right now but he will bounce back like the back-to-back Vezina Trophy finalist has always done after a tough stretch. There are still 16 games remaining in the season so Holtby needs to figure out how to stop his slump now or else it could be another very long summer for Holtby and the Capitals.

By Harrison Brown

About Harrison Brown

Harrison is a diehard Caps fan and a hockey fanatic with a passion for sports writing. He attended his first game at age 8 and has been a season ticket holder since the 2010-2011 season. His fondest Caps memory was seeing T.J. Oshie's hat-trick​ during Game 1 of the Caps' second round playoff series against Pittsburgh in 2016. In his spare time, he enjoys travel, photography, and hanging out with his two dogs. Follow Harrison on Twitter @HarrisonB927077
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7 Responses to When Did Braden Holtby’s Struggles Begin?

  1. “…Holtby may be going through a rough stretch right now but he will bounce back like the back-to-back Vezina Trophy finalist has always done after a tough stretch…”

    Oh for Pete’s sake Harrison take off your rose tinted glasses for a moment and focus on the bigger issue. You have no idea when or if Holtby will emerge from this long, horrid stretch of play in time to redeem a campaign he’d just as soon forget. He could be mired, perhaps inextricably, in the Steve Blass, Mackey Sasser, Steve Sax syndrome where his failings are so deeply embedded in his head that he won’t be able to get himself straight in time for the Caps’ annual second round exit at the hands of the Penguins…

    And if that’s the case, to me it would make more sense to prepare Phillip Grubauer–clearly the steadier of the two goalies at this point–to take over the reigns and get used to playing 60 minutes on most nights.

    Now isn’t the time for sentimentality. Based on his performance this season I think Grubauer deserves better–and so do our long-suffering fans–at least as far as the playoffs are concerned, don’t you think?…

    Clifford
    Sta. Monica

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: If The Capitals Want Playoff Success They Must Rest Holtby | NoVa Caps

  3. Grap says:

    These stats confirm what I already sensed, Holtby starts choking even before the playoffs begin. I think they rushed him into the star role too soon and he was not ready for the pressure. Can’t really blame him, that’s a ton of pressure. I would go 1a/ 1b from here out and ride whoever has the hot hand into the playoffs with a short leash.

    Like

  4. Pingback: Philipp Grubauer Proving Himself as a Number One Goalie | NoVa Caps

  5. Pingback: Grubauer To Start Game 2 For Capitals Against Blue Jackets | NoVa Caps

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