Looking Back on the Capitals Career of Craig Laughlin

Photo: Washington Capitals

For former Capitals forward Craig Laughlin, most of his life has revolved around the Capitals. Since 1990, he’s worked as the team’s color analyst on television broadcasts and is heavily involved in the community work that the organization partakes in. Before that he spent five and a half seasons of his NHL career in Red, White, and Blue.


While the younger generation of Caps fans will know him for his work with Comcast SportsNet (formerly Home Team Sports), older fans may remember him during his playing career with the team. NoVa Caps is taking a look back on the celebrated Washington career of “Locker”.

Locker came to the Caps in what many consider to be the best trade in franchise history. With the team struggling to find success (they had never made the Stanley Cup Playoffs in their eight-year existence), newly-hired General Manager David Poile sent two of the team’s highly-touted young players, Ryan Walter and Rick Green, to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Laughlin, Rod Langway, Brian Engblom, and Doug Jarvis. The acquisition of these four jolted the Capitals into Cup contenders, and set them up for a substantial amount of success.

_50A1664While the others (Langway in particular) would play their part in helping the team reach the Playoffs, Laughlin proved to be a productive offensive player during his time with the Caps. During his five and a half year tenure, he averaged 18 goals, 29 assists, and 47 points. In total, he scored 110 goals, 173 assists, and 283 points in 428 games played. In the playoffs, he scored 10 points (six goals, four assists) in 27 games played with D.C. For advanced stats fanatics, he averaged 0.66 points (0.26 goals and 0.40 assists) per game during his time in Washington.

Midway through the 1987-88 season, Laughlin was traded to the Los Angeles Kings for defenseman Grant Ledyard. He retired in 1990 and joined the Capitals as a color analyst on the team’s television broadcast. And he’s been in that role ever since. Entering his 26th season as a broadcaster, Locker has stayed heavily involved in the Caps community, participating in charitable events, the team’s annual Fan Fest and alumni game at Kettler Capitals Iceplex, the Caps Conventions, and even the 2011 NHL Winter Classic Alumni game.


Craig Laughlin has had many memorable moments during both his playing and broadcasting careers and it’s likely he’s nowhere near finished providing Caps Nation with plenty more!

By Michael Fleetwood

About Michael Fleetwood

Michael Fleetwood was born into a family of diehard Capitals fans and has been watching games as long as he can remember. He was born the year the Capitals went to their first and only Stanley Cup Final, and is a diehard Caps fan the owner of the very FIRST Joe Beninati jersey and since then, has met Joe himself. His favorite player became former Capital Nate Schmidt after he met Schmidt in a Hershey hotel while in Hershey PA to see the Bears play, shortly after Schmidt was injured during a conditioning stint. Michael is also a fan of the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Orioles, and enjoys photography and reading in his spare time. (Photo by Adam Vingan in 2014 at the Capitals Development Camp).
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6 Responses to Looking Back on the Capitals Career of Craig Laughlin

  1. Ron Bove says:

    Great article. You can’t help but to love him and Joe B when they do a game. They work so well together and you can tell they enjoy each other and they have fun doing it..

    Liked by 1 person

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